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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN2 22
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CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 4:45pm EST
created more minutes than. many new religions are created, but they don't survive after the death of the charismatic leader because there's no person to follow a period david miscarriage save scientology. they saved it from the mistakes hubbard made. 1993 -day-old billion dollars for at the time. at the time, we at $129 million. they've decided we have to get our tax exemption. saturday go about it? been launched 2400 lawsuit against the irs and individual agents. they hired private detectives to go around to conferences where they trail people and find out who's drinking too much, who was sleeping around to publish articles in the magazines about this and pass them the steps of 1111 constitution avenue, which is headquarters of the irs. they intimidated the irs. now whatever the merits of their case, those were the facts that surrounded their getting a tax exemption. it was -- you know, i just said they owed a billion dollars. the irs prime and $12 million did they forget the billion dollars. they gave them the authority to decide on their own which parts of the church are actual
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 8:45pm EST
by theologians and philosophers of religion. insofar as the present is the product of the past, any adequate historical accounts must be able to pay attention to antics lang all of these claims. the modern liberal institutions variously characteristic of all contemporary western states permit this ideological heterogeneity through the legal and political protection of individual citizens to believe and live as they please so long as they obey the established laws. so that is what needs to be accounted for. these institutions in the ideologicideologic al heterogeneity that they bring. the book's explanation of how the past became the present question says mark mentions many widely held assumptions. the reason is simple. typical narratives, common conceptions of change over time and ordinary historical methodologies cannot answer the book central question. they fail to do justice to the full range of moral and metaphysical commitment encompassed under the first-person plural, we. when it is used inclusively have all present-day europeans and the americans. who are we? we should not underestima
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 5:15am EST
of religion which is something we support. i think the more information you get the more you find out there are -- [inaudible] myths out there about the aclu -- my book is about people not only terrorists not only about them but us. now peter was asking before about the impact of some of these surveillance provisions and so forth. i was talking about how it gives us less privacy under the fourth amendment. it's not just the fourth amendment. it's also, you know, you talk about freedom of religion. that's about the first amendment. and my concern is that we're losing a lot of first amendment rights in term of freedom of speech, association, and of religion. so the freedom of religion if the government went after muslim charities right after 9/11. there were a lot of charities shut don -- down or doing badly. even though there was no evidence doing anything wrong. this that harms the first amendment. a study publish a week ago -- they did a survey of their members, the journalists and writers members of it. and what they found was that one in six of the people they surveyed said they ce
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 7:00am EST
thing than the religion of islam which is practiced by so many people in some way different ways more than a billion people in the world. but i think this misunderstanding of the nature of the threat of the ideology of islamism the human rights of muslim heritage themselves persist today. i would argue and see this at the moment in the press coverage of what is happening in countries like egypt. doing this kind of work on the front lines without international support, without international comprehension of the challenge that you face is an incredibly lon lonely endeav. i have seen this firsthand. as a lawyer told me back in december 2012, at a time when entire northern half of her country was under jihadists occupation, she said international solidarity is very helpful. when you live such a crisis alone, it is much more difficult to bear. what my book is really about is trying to break this wall of loneliness and silenced by connecting the people who are doing these struggles on the ground, the people around the world who stand for similar values of tolerance and equality and against
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2013 11:40pm EST
was a little boy but changed his life in terms of faith and religion. deeply religious. and yet, he was completely devastated by this event. he felt like nothing. he felt like if he could be hunted down like an animal, if he could see his friend getting killed, it's like he couldn't understand it, he couldn't compute. but the last time i saw him, he was in a relationship. he had a child, the person he was with had several children, say he was a stepdad, and he seemed if not happy but in a better place than when i met him. so you know, time heals sometimes and people move on. >> if one could assume that if thithishappens in other places,- speeto. >> one thing i found while reporting this book -- there was so much i didn't know. writing a book is like getting a phd. one thing i found out is [inaudible] a hate crime against latinos lately historically. we have a pretty -- it's in the book. there is a chapter on that. we have a history in terms of hate crimes and we just don't know about it. there's some pretty horrific hate crimes that have taken place in other cities and states. not n
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2013 11:00pm EST
of faith and religion. deeply religious. and yet, he was completely devastated by this event. he felt like nothing. he felt like if he could be hunted down like an animal, if he could see his friend getting killed, it's like he couldn't understand it, he couldn't compute. but the last time i saw him, he was in a
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 2:40pm EST
islam a as a great religion while at the same time seeing no contradiction in denouncing, opposing and rallying the nation to fight the we accelerated branch of islam -- perverted branch of islam which attacked us so wantonly on nerve. i wrote at the time and i believe to this day that history will treat you like harry truman, recognizing the depths of your achievement and creating the very infrastructure that will carry us through this war on barbarism. we are already seeing in this today in a kind of backhanded tribute to you as those who so criticized you during those eight years, the very people who did criticize you in those eight years when they came to power, they adopted the very same tools that you bequeathed to them, and that you and your administration had created in a moment of national confusion and danger. just as truman did in his day, providing the infrastructure, the tools and the institutions that carried us through the cold war in those days and will carry us through this war. in this generation. and if i can just repeat what i said to you in private, but i'd lik
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 8:00pm EST
liquor store. the question of a religion or culture, as you know, for all intents and purposes, everyone speaks english. and even qataris people, especially those that attend the american branch campuses, a lot of times they don't speak every arabica. so that issues that revolve around culture politics tend to be those that are important and the erosion of the cultural authenticity or the qatari culture rather than demands for transparency. these issues can be relatively easy to addressed by the powers that be. for example, you can ban the sale of alcohol is the government did before. or you can somehow address this sale of pork within the country. by and large, at least for the time being, given the current political economy of the country, the population tends to be a political for a variety of reasons. it does not mean that there is individual dissent that might exist. but now, is there something that the sentencing of this, as you know, the poet is accused of personally insulting a very personal type of insult against a ruling family and that becomes extremely difficult in the contex
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2013 6:00am EST
the emergence of terrorism justified by islamic politics and certain interpretation of religion. we had the first world trade center bombing in 93 remember, and the people getting pummeled in bosnia where muslims. it was a source of concern to people all across the world. i received calls from both the polk ape and the king of saudi arabia asking me to intervene, the first time they were ever on the same issue. dick holbrooke said it was a problem from hell. and when we read discussing how everything happens at once, the aftermath with somalia, haiti, bosnia, tony lake cracked one of the best lines of all time he worked in the white house. sometimes i really miss the cold war. bosnia in some ways became a metaphor for the struggles of the 21st century. the first conflict which reminded us the end of the cold war basically took the veil off this image we were privileged to have even when it didn't comport with reality that there was a bipolar world and as dangerous as it was with nuclear weapons hanging around at least it was organized. even our spies helped each other, i used to say. if
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 7:00pm EST
was a little boy that changed his life in terms of faith and religion. deeply religious, and yet he was completely devastated by this event. he felt like nothing. he felt like if he could be hunted down like an animal, if he could see his friend getting killed, just, like, he could not understand it, he could not compute it, but the last time i saw him, he was in a relationship. he had a job. the person he's with has several chirp, so he was a step dad, and he seemed, if not happy, in a better place than when i met him. you know, time heals, sometimes. people move on. >> to assume this happens in our places too, so have you found anything? >> you know, one thing that i found while reporting this book, there was so much i didn't know; right? it's, like, anything, you know? writing a book is like getting a ph.d. on something. one thing i found out is that practically not one state has not had a hate crime against latinos, lately, but also his story going -- we have a pretty -- it's in the book. there's a whole chapter on that. we have a pretty dismal history in terms of hate crimes. w
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 7:00am EST
come together on in this country, and we're divided by politics, divided by religion, divided by what cable news network we watched. but on sunday about two-thirds of america comes together in a watch football. they do this on super bowl sunday. most americans in front of a tv set. when you look up in the stands at a football game, you see america. when you look on the field, you see people from all geographic locations. you see people from all different classes extension of aqc people from all different racial groups. it is america down on the field. that's something we should be encouraging. we shouldn't be trying to stamp it out. and about what happened in new orleans a few years ago after hurricane katrina. the city looked down and out. it almost looked like their football team. do you remember the new orleans saints? they were so pathetic that their fans were bags over their heads. all of the sudden after hurricane katrina, there's all these politicians trying to bring back new orleans. they all failed. they can get the city united. they can't bring it back. what brought back new
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 12:00pm EST
, intersection of religion and politics, different side of our president and a lot of folks get to see. sometimes we see him as an avatar on our television screens, in the white house press briefing room or giving a speech. i have gotten to know him as the man who has vulnerabilities, is compassionate, has his own flaws but at the end of the day is a decent human being and been able to show a little bit of that side of him in the book in "the president's devotional". i would like to read a little bit of it for you. give you a taste of what some of the devotionals are about and open up too a couple questions and sign some books. one of the themes i often came back to in "the president's devotional" is really helping the president find a sense of joy and laughter and gladness in the midst of some difficult and deep and serious times. he is a pretty serious guy himself and i wanted to use the devotional to allow him to release a little bit and get to a place of joy. to dance beneath the diamond sky with one hand waving free silhouetted by the sea circled by the circumstances, with all memory and fai
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 10:05pm EST
in the first term and now i'm a weekly religion columnist for the daily beast and i run a social consulting company called cell use partnership. >> do you have a church? >> i attend a congregation in dc. i was an associate pastor in cambridge massachusetts. >> how did you get associated with the president and his faith-based initiative? >> i started with him early in the senate term in 2005, but yesterday to sending devotionals during the campaign. i was a staffer doing outreach to give other folks and i decided one day that in addition to policy right, he needs somebody thinking about his full. i decided to send an e-mail wendy and i have no idea if he would respond or like it. it was a reflection on the 23rd psalm that he wrote me back and said this is exactly what i needed today. what you do every day? was six years ago and i've been sending them ever since. >> when we read "the president's devotional," what will we find? >> 365 of the devotionals that he helps find him start his day with joy and get through tough times. you'll find stories of faith in the white house. president obama li
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2013 12:00pm EST
can do better and knitting mills as we look at good religion and wellness as well. >> my name is rachel gore won the academy for state health currency. what areas you mentioned the role of state. i was wondering if you could talk about what the long-term consequences easy for the different experiences people will be having from state to state. a state like new york where they've done a marketplace in their expanding a decade, consumers are having a much different experience than maybe mississippi that has a federal marketplace and aeronautics unit. speak not well, i've always thought that having remodels first aid exchanges is really a very good thing. we have the state models and we are at the are these the united states to california and kentucky in a number of states, washington, connecticut, obviously massachusetts, they've done extremely well and their performance out that to be highlighted and studied as to what it is they're doing that other states failed to do so far? the second model is the hybrid model we got partial federal involvement and partial state involvement.
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 10:00pm EST
. somebody a strong bailiff in their religion. i have a strong belief in my religion. it doesn't mean i'm going an extreme and do something violent that's what we have to deal with. we have to deal with the elements in whatever walk of life that will turn to violence and challenge not only societies that can't take care of themselves, but also us in our way of life. i think that's a difficult challenge that we're facing. i think as we look around the world and see societies and the underpinnings whey describe in some there's a sense of hopelessness. that's where we have to understand that. we have to decide whether we're going do anything about it or not. some cases question some case we can't. what we would like to do is help other nations and other regions of the world, certainly to be able to help themselves. that's what a global leader should do. i think that's what we try do all the time. as i see the military, with the military has been involved in over the years. that's with we try to do. it doesn't make any difference what their intkd. other questions? let me go income the back.
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 8:30am EST
of marriage and all of that. i agree that you can't force a religion. you certainly cannot legislate a religion to accept it, but there is the reality, today is, that there's going to be probably 17 states by the end of this year who are waiting for the illinois law to get signed and new mexico, supreme court case to be decided, but there could be up to 17 states by the end of this year in the next several months that have gay marriage. that number is going to grow. it's not going to decrease. so this debate is on the brink of becoming moot. >> i mean, sure there are some social costs. we look at countries such as benevolence or sweden, the cohabitation rates have risen. less people getting the. more people are putting marriage off. >> is that because of gay marriage? >> harvey i think so spent it's because straight people don't want to get married. they just want to shack up spent i think we've made into a quaint social custom instead of, i think our policy would be better served strengthening marriage and making sure every child our gay speedy so how does gay marriage we can -- how
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 8:00pm EST
and there are ramifications for politics and religion in europe. across europe, people think this printing press is bad news and we need to find a way to control it. they say you cannot own a printer press unless you have a license from the government and all documents have to be checked. but this system fails to work immediately. they are ways of getting around the licensing requirements. when given a license, you can write under license on a document and list a different pripter -- printer or make one up -- it is hard for the authorities to figure out who printed the document and you get a fight from the de-centralized nature of the environment and the desire to control it by government. we recognize this from the 1500s and now. >> tom standage is here with us and he is the author of "writing on the wall" what is your day job? >> i am a digital editor at the economist and part of that led to my interest in historical media. we have returning to the way things used to work. and the economist came out of culture of clubs and coffee shops and discussions. there is a lot we can learn from looking at the histo
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2013 12:00am EST
interpretation of religions. we already had the first world trade center bombing in 1993, remember, and the people hurt in bosnia were muslims. it was a source of concern to people all across the word. i received calls from both the pope and the king of saudi arabia asking me to intervene in bosnia. i wondered where that was the first time they had been on the same side of an issue. dick holbrook said it was the problem from hell. when we discussed how everything happens at once, the aftermath of somalia, highty, bosnia, tony crack the one of the best lines of all in the white house. he said, you know, sometimes i really miss the cold war. [laughter] bosbosnia in some ways was a struggle for the 21st century. it was the first conflict which reminded us that the end of the cold war basically took the vail off this image we were privileged to have, even when it did not share with reality that there was a bipolar world and as dangerous as it was, at least it was organized. even our spies helped each other out, i used to say, you know, if the russians were better off if the spies in th
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 8:00am EST
ramifications for politics and religion in europe. rulers across europe think, oh, dear, this printing press is bad news. we need to find a way to control this, so they start imposing these controls on the press. they say you can't own a printing press unless you have a license from the government, all documents have to be checked before they can be printed. but with almost immediately this system fails to work. there are ways of getting round the licensing requirements. you can do things like when you're given a license to print be something, you know, up to say under license on -- you can just write under license on a document anyway. you can list a completely different printer from the one who actually printed it or maybe make one up. you can print under a pseudonym, and it's very hard for the authorities to figure out who has printed this document and to go and punish them. so you get this fight between the decentralized nature of the media environment and the desire to centralize and control it by governments which we recognize as a phenomenon be of the internet era, but it's actually g
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2013 6:00pm EST
their religion is to destroy us. host: we will have you respond to that. negotiating in a religious way? guest: he is right to a great extent. we arenians have said the great evil and they're going to wipe israel off the face of the earth. in the middle eastern culture, it is looked upon with high regard to get the best deal possible no matter what it takes, that includes lying. that is one reason the gulf states like to work with the u.s., because we are honest and transparent. they like doing business with us as opposed to their partners or even the communist chinese. they like doing business with people that are honest and transparent. that is an underpinning to these negotiations. once again, if you are willing to blow yourself up and commit suicide in order to blow up other people, you are not a rational person. up other people, you are not a rational person. that is to you are dealing with when you are dealing with uranian's. host: -- iranians. host: you are saying that all middle eastern countries are this way? part of the middle eastern culture to get the best deal that you can, wheth
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 1:30pm EST
of excited. .. , religion, philosophy, morality and this book is banned in many places but in the united states for obscenity and elson -- isn't all that obscene. chapter iii, candied gets away from the bulgarian army. there's nothing so gallons, so brilliant and well disposed as the two armies, trumpets, a lobos, cannon's made such music as hell itself had never heard. must get swept away from the dust of the world, the bayonet was also up sufficient reason for the deaths of several thousand. in the amount of 30,000 souls. candide who travel bike and philosophers did himself as well as he could in this heroic butchery. and made the two kings were crossing, went to reason elsewhere. dead and dying and reached a neighboring village. within cinders. was a bear village the bulgarians according to the law of the war. told men covered with wounds held their wives, hugging their children, massacred before their faces. their daughters, disemboweled and greeting their last after satisfying the want of bulgarian heroes and others, have burned in the flames begged to be dispatched. it was strewn w
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 2:00pm EST
interpretation of religion. we are to the first world trade in the bombing in 93, remember. the people who are getting pummeled in bosnia were muslims. it was a source of concern to people across the world. i received calls from both the pope and the king of saudi arabia, asking me to intervene and bath and. and i wondered whether that was the first time they've ever been on the same side of an issue. to call broke said it was the problem from. and when we were once discussing how everything happens at once, the aftermath of somalia, haiti, bosnia, toilet cracked one of the stress lines the whole time he worked in the white house. he said you know, sometimes i really missed the cold war. bosnia in some ways became a memoir for the 21st century. it was the first conflict, which reminded us that the end of the cold war basically took the veil off this mh we were privileged to have come even when it didn't fully comport with reality that there was a bipolar world and is dangerous otherwise come with all these nuclear weapons hanging around, at least it was organized. even our spies helped eac
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